More Links Than A Bag Of Sausages

Mar. 29th, 2017 03:00 am
petzipellepingo: (more links by eyesthatslay)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo
EW reports that Simon Pulse will be writing a new series. "new spinoff series of the cult classic television show that will be written by New York Times bestselling author Kiersten White. The series, which will be published in the fall of 2018, will be titled Slayer and will feature a brand new slayer from the group of potentials that Willow used her Wicca skills to awaken in the show’s final episode". "On October 3, Simon Pulse is also set to release Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Twenty Years of Slaying, a special hardcover collector’s edition that highlights all the best content from Volumes 1–3 of the original Watcher’s Guides, as well as exclusive new content, including never-before-seen interviews with the cast and crew".

What Went Right - 29 MAR 2017

Mar. 29th, 2017 09:49 am
megpie71: Animated "tea" icon popular after London bombing. (Default)
[personal profile] megpie71
Another day, another three things about "what went right" from my news feeds.

Gravity Discovery Centre observatory: a place to explore the wonders of the cosmos and origins of life by Emma Wynne (ABC Radio Perth, Western Australia)

A profile piece about the Gravity Discovery Centre observatory at Gingin, and its senior astronomer, Richard Tonello.

Hardy inland spangled perch make the most of heavy WA rains as desert creek beds turn to rivers by Rachel Day (ABC Goldfields, Western Australia)

A chance discovery of small fish flipping about on the side of a flooded road in the Goldfields reveals the spangled perch - a desert fish which is incredibly hardy and can survive a wide range of conditions.

Young WA farming family grows eco-house out of cereal crop by Lisa Morrison (ABC Great Southern, Western Australia)

The Maesepp-Potter family in Katanning live in an off-grid, straw-bale house they built from materials sourced on their working sheep and grain farm (the straw-bales were barley straw grown on the farm, the thermal walls are rock sourced from the northern end of their property). They're opening the doors of their home to the public as part of the Great Southern Sustainable Living festival.

So there's my three for the day. If you've seen any articles about what went right in your news feeds, why not share a link in the comments, and boost the signal?
chasingdemons: (Default)
[personal profile] chasingdemons posting in [community profile] su_herald
SPIKE: So I'm strolling through the park, looking for a meal, and I happen to walk by, and she's making out with the chaos demon! And so I said, 'You know, I don't have to put up with this.' And she said, 'Fine!' So I said, 'Fine, do whatever you like!' I mean, I thought we were going to make up, you know.
JOYCE: Well, she sounds very unreasonable.
SPIKE: She is. She's out of her mind. That's what I miss most about her.
JOYCE: Well, Spike, sometimes even when two people seem right for each other, their lives just take different paths. When Buffy's father and I...
SPIKE: No, this is different. Our love was eternal. Literally. You got any of those little marshmallows?
JOYCE: Well, lemme look.

~~Lovers Walk (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 3, Episode 8)~~




[Drabbles & Short Fiction]
[Chaptered Fiction]
[Images]
[Reviews & Recaps]
[Recs]
[Community Announcements]
[Fandom Discussion]

[syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed

Posted by Fred Clark

This is the difference between Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman. Parks effectively and strategically practiced civil disobedience. She broke an unjust law, submitting to her arrest and prosecution, and thereby helped to spark a public debate and a mass movement that ultimately changed and corrected that unjust law. Harriet Tubman broke an unjust law -- many unjust laws -- but she was compelled not to get caught doing so, for her own sake and for the sake of those she rescued.

[ SECRET POST #3737 ]

Mar. 28th, 2017 06:30 pm
case: (Default)
[personal profile] case posting in [community profile] fandomsecrets

⌈ Secret Post #3737 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.


More! )


Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 01 pages, 21 secrets from Secret Submission Post #533.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.

FMK #6: Beloved Authors

Mar. 28th, 2017 03:15 pm
melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
[personal profile] melannen
So last week's FMK loser was Ben Bova's The Multiple Man, and tbh my only qualm with dumping that one is that I will no longer have a nice big pile of books with MEN in their title. Well, and also feeling a little bit bad for Jamie Madrox.

The winner was The Female Man by Joanna Russ! (The Bester was surprisingly close for awhile, probably because the Russ was getting a lot of M votes. Predictably.) I will be putting up a response for that one when I have finished reading it.

This week's theme is "Authors who have at least one series on my 'definitely keep' shelf but I am kind of afraid to branch out to their other stuff in case I don't like it". This should be a fun one!

How FMK works, short version: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Tuesday, and write a response to the F winner sometime in the next week.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)
Poll: Alexander, Anderson, Bujold, Hambly, Harrison, Leiber, McKillip, Piper, Pratchett, Rosenberg, Smith, Vinge, Wrightson, Yolen )

Mid-week Antiprocrastination!

Mar. 28th, 2017 08:11 pm
peaceful_sands: butterfly (Default)
[personal profile] peaceful_sands posting in [community profile] bitesizedcleaning
Here we go again, time to stop procrastinating and do that thing! So what are you all up to? What's top of the list for you? Will you share your challenges and progress with us?

Any suggestions for the rest of us? What helps motivate you?

Good luck and cheers to you all! I hope your midweek goes well, progress is made and that you find something to be proud of.
[syndicated profile] thatbadadvicetumblr_feed

Posted by thingsthatareawful

It’s Bad Advice Tuesday over at the Establishment, and this week, one mom wants to know the best way to tell her daughter’s employer all the torrid details of her extramarital affair:

Read the Bad Advisor’s terrible advice to this letter writer and two other ice cold messes right here.

Prompt for 2017-03-29

Mar. 29th, 2017 01:32 am
sacredporn: Kris Allen icon made by Sacred Porn (Default)
[personal profile] sacredporn posting in [community profile] dailyprompt
Today's prompt is "where are you?"

Culture Consumed Tuesday

Mar. 29th, 2017 03:53 am
vass: Jon Stewart reading a dictionary (books)
[personal profile] vass
[being for the past fortnight. I'm posting now before it gets any more behind]

Books

Finished Too Flash. Interesting, and not what I thought it was going to be like. The structure of the book felt like it was searching for its own heart, its own subject, in the same way that the protagonist, Zo, was searching for hers. Both book and character got there in the end. It reminded me of Jenny Pausacker's Central High books in some ways, but more up to date and much less white. I want to read more by Lucashenko. Tiny disappointment: I thought Zo was gay or bi (there was a line earlier on that sounded like it confirmed this, plus she and Missy had some UST going on) but that never got followed up.

Back to wrestling with Pedagogy of the Oppressed. It got better, and then it got worse again.

"Usually this leadership group is made up of men..." [here I stopped reading and said aloud "Well, there's your problem right there"] "...of men who in one way or another have belonged to the social strata of the dominators. At a certain point, in their existential experience, under certain historical conditions, these men renounce the class to which they belong and join the oppressed, in an act of true solidarity (or so one would hope)." Isn't it nice when the picture you draw of What This Revolution Needs comes out looking exactly like you?

So, comrade Freire, why can't the oppressed class be the revolutionary leaders? "It is extremely unlikely that these self-mistrustful, downtrodden, hopeless people will seek their own liberation -- an act of rebellion which they may view as a disobedient violation of the will of God, as an unwarranted confrontation with destiny." Oh. I see.

You know how I wrote earlier about the inherent contradictions in writing a book about revolutionary education for oppressed illiterates written in jargon even most university graduates would have some difficulty with? There is no contradiction. He's THAT guy. The one who is here for you, everything he is doing here is for YOUR sake, he WANTS to help you realise your full potential, but you have to do it on his terms, and he's the one who decides when you've learned the necessary lessons.

Which will only come when you accept him as your new thought leader while simultaneously humouring his fantasy that because he "betrayed" his ruling class background to come help liberate you from their rule by becoming your new leader, that means he's just as working class as you.

He even writes about this particular danger of revolutionary leaders and how they should be careful NOT to fall into that trap.

19 more pages to go. There are some really great paragraphs here, and some fucking awful chapters. :(

[Disclaimer: my parents are an academic and a psychologist. QED, I am not working class myself. I'm on disability, but I have more safety net than most people on disability because of my family, and also the privilege of not having been poor growing up, and of having been taught/enabled to regard authority figures as my social equals. I think it's important for me to acknowledge this while I'm tearing strips out of someone else for his unchecked privilege, lest I sound even more like Seivarden Vendaai Discovers Class Discourse 101. While I have had my own run-ins with "that guy" described above, mine were on a different axis of privilege, disability not class.]

Started reading Kate Elliott's Black Wolves, the first of her books I've read. So far... it's not hard work, and that's a relief, that's why I picked up a blockbuster fantasy novel from the library, and I do like the setting, but I do feel like it's missing something. Some subtle flavour or other. Maybe it'll show up later in the book.

TV and Movies

Went to see Hidden Figures. SO good.

It's so important that this movie got made, and did well, that it'd be churlish to criticise it at all. But if I did have a criticism, it'd be that it bent over a bit too far in the Not ALL White People direction. Which was probably what they had to do, to get it past the gatekeepers. The business with the bathroom sign in particular was a white saviour fantasy on a level I can only express in hexadecimal, namely #FFFFFF. (And I didn't notice the swearword hashtag until looking again at what I just typed, but I stand by it.)

APART from that bullshit, just... well, it's actually amazing how little of that bullshit there was, and how much they pushed back at it. Like the part when Kirsten Dunst's character (successful white career woman who's possibly (the film didn't state either way) very supportive of her white female colleagues, but is pulling up that ladder behind them as fast as she can) meets Dorothy Vaughan in the bathroom and tries to be all "believe it or not, I have nothing against you," and gee, I suppose, but you sure are not even one fraction of one percent for her, are you? And Octavia Spencer, as Dorothy Vaughan, replies something like "I can believe that you might think that," which is as close to a "you keep telling yourself that, arsehole" as she could possibly have gotten under the circumstances.

Taraji P. Henson's performance as Katherine Johnson was the heart of the film, and she and Janelle Monáe's Mary Jackson were amazing, but the part I loved the most was actually Dorothy Vaughan's arc, about thinking forward to the need to retrain herself and her workers as programmers so they wouldn't be put out of work by the new computing machines. When she taught herself FORTRAN and taught all her workers too and insisted they be hired along with her.

And this wasn't presented as some sort of fluffy innate nurturing quality in her, some sort of facile 'Johnson's the smart one, Jackson's the sexy one, Vaughan's the motherly one.' Ugh. It could have been, but it wasn't. You could see that all three of the protagonists were brilliant (and nurturing, and romantic/sexual people.) Vaughan got a couple of scenes on her own with the IBM machine, troubleshooting it and using punchcards for the first time (identifying it as female -- you could see the logic there: all the human computers are women, so the digital computer must be female too; and she could have hated it or wanted to sabotage it, but she didn't, she saw its beauty immediately) and you could see that that was where she wanted to be, where her genius was. Her teaching and looking after her team (above and beyond the requirements of her job, I mean) was because it was the right thing to do. An act of solidarity, of justice.

Watched some more B99. It's interesting, because I do have an embarassment squick, but it's gotten less intense lately and I forgot it existed. The Thanksgiving episode reminded me. *cringe*

Games

More Stardew Valley, of course. My veggies took first prize at the fair. Suck it, Pierre! Emoji have a lot to answer for: every time I pull up an eggplant, I think of dicks. Disconcerting.

Podcasts

Finished the Archon Drom story arc of The Hidden Almanac, which was a lot of fun. I am staring down the barrel of a Hidden Almanac shortage, though. Gonna have to find something else soothing and safe to listen to right before bed. It might be time to catch up on my Jay and Miles X-Plain The X-Men listening. Which is not nearly as soothing, but is safe for whatever nebulous value of safe my backbrain assigns to such things.

Garden

Started my first compost bin. Beatrice and Dorian helped by supplying the bin's first contribution, the contents of their litter boxes. I am informed that this means I shouldn't use the resulting compost on my veggies, under penalty of toxoplasmosis, but it's fine for flowers. So I'll start some flowers, and it'll mean Beatrice and Dorian aren't contributing as much to landfill. Go them.

Bunnings are selling daffodil bulbs, and oh yeah, that's because it's March, and March is when the bulbs go on sale. I forgot, because it is STILL FUCKING SUMMER. I bought a value-bag of 14 and put them in the crisper drawer of the fridge, because like fuck is it time to plant them.

I also bought another marigold (how are marigolds still flowering?) and a couple of tiny cacti which I put in a planter on the windowsill in one room where the cats aren't allowed (the one with what Dorian likes to believe is a cat-sized swimming pool) and added little Pokemon figurines. There is already a plastic skull on that windowsill. I ROCK at interior decor.

Tomatoes are still growing even though it is nearly April. But global warming is just a myth, right? One of the Russian Black ones finally ripened enough for me to eat it, and it may have been the best tomato I ever tasted. I'm not usually given to hyperbole, and I want to hedge that "best" even further because I'm shit at ranking things best-worst and I can't remember all the tomatoes I've eaten, and Russian Black tomatoes are normally very good... but wow that was a good tomato. Easily the best one I've eaten this year.

Other

Playing with i3wm customisation. I've been using i3 for nearly a year now, but hadn't done more than the bare minimum to make it habitable (i.e. moved the bar up the top and deleted the alerts I didn't need so they wouldn't glare red at me) until now. I have now learned about the screen locker app, proper deployment of feh as a wallpaper app, and some very minor keybinding adjustments.

I also created a test user account and messed harder than that with the settings there (trying to learn the GNU stash app, and to import other people's dotfiles unaltered) with less success (unless you count the fact that I did so on a test account and didn't lock myself out of my own user account -- that's its own sort of success.)

Other customisations I want to do soon:

- the config line that looks in a wallpaper directory and randomly picks a different one for each workspace, each session (the Arch wiki is extremely helpful on what exact line to put in your config to do that. I love the Arch wiki.)

- the "open this application in this workspace on startup" thing. Which is complicated because I have seven different Firefox windows open, all full of tabs, and Opinions on which one should be in which workspace, but as far as i3 knows they're all just Firefox. And workspace 1 is terminals, of course, but last time I tried to use the i3 script that lets you save your layout, I fell into a maze of twisty Perl back-compatibility problems, all alike. But even if I just tell if to open one terminal in workspace 1, open all the Firefoxes in workspace 2, and open a text editor in workspace 9, that's a start, right?

- the one I would really love to do, but suspect is going to be more difficult and complicated than I'd like to think: terminal transparency, with a different background behind each terminal window. I have these motivational memes (an angry lion captioned 'Gladly Feast On Those Who Would Subdue You' and so on, and of course Heal Yourself, Skeletor, and Calmage Wolfatee and so on) that I'd like to be able to see dimly behind my terminals. I figure that because i3 does containers and each window is in its own container, it should be possible to run a different instance of feh in each new container in workspace 1, but I haven't tested it and this is way beyond my level of knowledge or experience.

- a pleasing and harmonious colour scheme for terminal text and the i3 bar (I'd like to use lemonbar, but haven't gotten lemonbar to work yet.)

Cats

Beatrice would like it noted for the record that she is still a ferocious predator. She would enter the little blue and yellow polyester feather-ball cat toy thing in evidence, but she doesn't want to let go of it just yet. She thinks it might still be alive.

Six Should Write:

Mar. 28th, 2017 08:48 am
redsixwing: Picture shows a red-winged angel staring at a distant blue star. (Default)
[personal profile] redsixwing
1. More of Madhukar and the Berettaflies.

2. A con-panel style presentation:  The Prehistory of Monster Hunter, outlined below.

3. A con-panel style presentation: Sacred Springs and Blessed Arrows: Shinto in Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, outlined below.

4. Work on the fanfic you already have to meet your goal.

I didn't put "more Ormarr background stuff" on this list because that will happen regardless.

Outlines )

Opinions?

(P.S. "yes" is a valid answer but will result in Must. Write. Faster.)

Is Xenophobia Really This Normative?

Mar. 28th, 2017 01:54 pm
[syndicated profile] lovejoyfeminism_feed

Posted by Libby Anne

I live in a city. My daughter attends school with immigrants and the children of immigrants. When I last canvased for a political candidate, I went with the knowledge that many of those living here are recent immigrants, and that not every home held an eligible voter. I can scarcely go out in public without hearing other languages, or English spoken with accents. But this is how it has always been---we are not and never have been a nation formed by any one culture or demography.Click through to read more!

Someone Else’s Babies

Mar. 28th, 2017 03:05 pm
[syndicated profile] faithforward_feed

Posted by Megan Schmidt

by Darcy Metcalfe “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” This is a recent controversial tweet from Republican Congressman Steve King from Iowa. As someone in the field of bioethics, an Iowa resident, and as a white woman who recently adopted a black son, King’s quote is particularly disturbing. Recent genomic studies have [Read More...]

it's all in the perspective

Mar. 28th, 2017 10:38 pm
tielan: (oops)
[personal profile] tielan
Social media - including blogs and journalling services like DW and LJ - are kind of creepy sometimes. I mean, where else could you have 100 or 800 or a 1000 people following you around, not saying anything to you...just watching...

I know, I've been online in journalling services like this for, oh, 16+ years, and I only just thought of it like that.
[syndicated profile] experimentaltheology_feed

Posted by Richard Beck

Again, most Bible readers have come across the great sea monster Leviathan in the pages of Scripture, perhaps noticing this dragon because there are many cultural references to Leviathan outside of the Bible. But there's a second, lesser known sea monster in the Bible as well.

Beyond Leviathan, the other sea dragon in the Bible is Rahab:
Job 26.10-12
He marks out the horizon on the face of the waters
for a boundary between light and darkness.

The pillars of the heavens quake,
aghast at his rebuke.

By his power he churned up the sea;
by his wisdom he cut Rahab to pieces.

Psalm 89.8-11
Who is like you, Lord God Almighty?
You, Lord, are mighty, and your faithfulness surrounds you.

You rule over the surging sea;
when its waves mount up, you still them.

You crushed Rahab like one of the slain;
with your strong arm you scattered your enemies.

The heavens are yours, and yours also the earth;
you founded the world and all that is in it.
Many commentators have contrasted the non-violence of the Jewish creation story in Genesis 1 with the violence of the Babylonian creation myths. For example, in the Enuma Elish Marduk kills the dragoness Tiamat, the primordial goddess of chaos who ruled the oceans. After slaying Tiamat, Marduk uses the parts of her body to create the world.

In the Babylonian myth, creation happens through killing and violence. This violence is missing in Genesis.

And yet, some see hints of the Enuma Elish in the biblical references to Leviathan and Rahab. Creation doesn't happen through violence in the Old Testament. But the chaotic elements of the world, represented in the great sea dragons Leviathan and Rahab, are tamed and subdued. When the Spirit of God moves over the chaotic deep and begins to speak a creative, ordering Word, this is imagined as a victory over the chaos and the deep, the taming and victory over of both Leviathan and Rahab.

I'll have more to say about Rahab in the next post, but just a final observation about slaying dragons and the warfare worldview of the Bible. Again, in the New Testament the Great Dragon becomes associated with Satan. And in calling Satan the Great Dragon the New Testament authors evoke the great dragons of the Old Testament, Leviathan and Rahab, and God's victory over them in rightly ordering the world.

The kingdom of God, creation and new creation, involves a victory over the dragon.

More Links Than A Bag Of Sausages

Mar. 28th, 2017 03:11 am
petzipellepingo: (more links by eyesthatslay)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo
Cold Comfort , Giles/Faith by [personal profile] il_mio_capitano.

The Guilty Culprit , Giles/Xander by [personal profile] angelus2hot.

Sign-ups now open at [community profile] seasonal_spuffy.

mini!ficathon: anything goes : 1. Any fandom is welcome, as usual.
2. Prompt as much as you wish, but make a separate comment for each prompt. The more prompts, the better, trust me.
3. When you fill a prompt, please leave a comment here (link, title, warnings, prompt). Art, fic, fill with whatever. Multiple fills encouraged!
4. Feedback is much appreciated, but you knew that already.
5. Have fun!

TheGuardian talks "When good TV goes bad: how Buffy the Vampire Slayer started to suck". "Like a bumble bee, it shouldn’t have worked but it did, beautifully. For six seasons. Then the seventh happened and it all went terribly wrong".

Profile

deird1: lilac flowers, with text "how do they rise up" (Default)
deird1

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415 161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Mar. 29th, 2017 09:13 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios